A sucker for vintage advertising

I have a problem.

I ordered an entire case of Pet Evaporated Milk.  12 12-oz. cans.  None of why I have an actual need for.
Why did I do this?
I blame Fibber McGee & Molly.

 

 

photo

 

Sometimes, I go to Dollar General Store to buy over-the-counter medicine.  Rexall brand to be exact.
Why do I do this?
I blame The Phil Harris – Alice Faye Show.

I ordered an 18-count pack of Lux soap.
Why did I do this?
I blame Lux Radio Theater.

photo(1)

You see, I am highly susceptible to 1940s & 1950s radio advertising.  Modern advertising doesn’t get me so much (save the Apple computer ads in 2003 with Verne Troyer and Yao Ming that suckered me into getting my first Mac.)  It makes me giddy that I can still get the same products that were advertised 70+ years ago.  Through the 1940s, the sponsor of Fibber McGee & Molly was Johnson’s Wax.  In the early 50s (1952 to be exact), Pet Milk took over as the sponsor.  I’ve been listening to the 1950s episodes of FM&M on my way home from work lately and their slogan for Pet Milk – “sweet, country milk condensed to double-richness” – just resonates with me for some stupid reason.  Like, so much that I searched for Pet Milk and was first dismayed that I couldn’t buy it locally and then overjoyed when I found out I could order it from the Smuckers website.  I did the same thing for Lux soap because I’m a huge fan of Lux Radio Theater, which aired from 1934 to 1955, and imagine my frustration to find out that it’s neither made nor sold in the US anymore.  I ended up ordering it from Amazon, but it was made in Egypt!  Both the Pet Milk and the Lux soap came today, which was my biggest bright spot during an otherwise cruddy afternoon.

So anyway, beginning tomorrow, I’m going to use Lux soap when I shower (it smells divine!) and add Pet Milk to my coffee because, after all, it’s condensed to double-richness!!!

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “A sucker for vintage advertising

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s